Rain and milder temperatures can impact outdoor leisure activities

While the rain isn’t ideal before a holiday weekend and school holidays, ski resorts aren’t letting the warmer weather put a damper on skiing. wrong,” said JJ Toland, director of communications at Jay Peak. Jay Peak has about 60 of its 81 trails open and is monitoring conditions closely. cold because when you go from that hot to cold things get a little bit icy,” Toland said. Between President’s Day weekend and school holiday week, the resort is almost 100% booked. Across the ski industry, bookings appear to be strong. “People don’t cancel their reservations. They’re still planning to visit Vermont,” said Molly Mahar, president of the Vermont Ski Areas Association. “And if you think about it, kids are out of school, families are looking for a break and want to get out and be able to enjoy the mountain.” Meanwhile, Stowe Mountain Resort used the colder temperatures earlier in the week to prepare for the warm front,” said Vail Resorts spokesman Adam White. He says the rain probably won’t keep people away. “We’ll always be popular. Skiers and snowboarders don’t mind a little warm weather,” White said. But on Lake Champlain, the warmer weather can melt away the ice-song fun. “The concern is weakening ice and rapidly deteriorating ice conditions,” Jason Batchelder of the Vermont Department of Fish and Wildlife. “Certainly after today they will want to think twice before driving anything heavy there.” may also suffer due to mild temperatures. “People should really pay attention to the trails they’re on and tread lightly with their sleds at this time,” Batchelder said. He says the trails can be chewed up when it gets warmer and the ice on Lake Champlain can vary. A good rule of thumb is to always be aware of surrounding conditions if you plan to have fun outdoors.

While the rain isn’t ideal before a holiday weekend and school holidays, ski resorts aren’t letting the warmer weather put a damper on skiing.

“We had a fairly significant snowpack before this weather event, so it won’t affect us too much,” said JJ Toland, communications manager at Jay Peak.

Jay Peak has about 60 of its 81 trails open and is monitoring conditions closely.

“You know, we’ll be closing a few more with the wind and the cold, because when you go from this hot to cold things will get a little frosty,” Toland said.

Between the President’s Day weekend and the week of the school holidays, the station is almost 100% booked. Across the ski industry, bookings appear to be strong.

“People aren’t canceling their reservations. They’re still planning to visit Vermont,” said Molly Mahar, president of the Vermont Ski Areas Association. “And if you think about it, kids are out of school, families are looking for a break and want to get out and be able to enjoy the mountains.

Meanwhile, Stowe Mountain Resort took advantage of colder temperatures earlier in the week to prepare for the warm front.

“We were snowing earlier in the week before the temperatures rose and we got the dreaded ‘R’ word,” said Vail Resorts spokesman Adam White.

He says the rain probably won’t keep people away.

“We will always be popular. Skiers and snowboarders don’t mind a bit of hot weather,” White said.

But on Lake Champlain, the warmer weather can melt away the ice-song fun.

“The problem is weakening ice and rapidly deteriorating ice conditions,” Jason Batchelder of the Vermont Department of Fish and Wildlife.

Other outdoor activities, such as snowmobiling, can also suffer from the mild temperatures.

“People should really pay attention to the trails they’re on and tread lightly with their sleds at this time,” Batchelder said.

He says the trails can be chewed up when it gets warmer and the ice on Lake Champlain can vary. A good rule of thumb is to always be aware of surrounding conditions if you plan to have fun outdoors.

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