Bull moose dies at Keystone ski resort after becoming entangled in electrical cords

A bull moose was killed at Keystone Ski Resort after becoming entangled in electrical cords from snowmaking equipment. An anonymous source emailed photos and video of the moose being dragged up the mountain behind a truck. (Provided to the Colorado Sun)

A bull moose died this week after becoming entangled in electrical cords attached to snowmaking equipment at Keystone Ski Resort.

Ski resort workers found the moose wrapped in wires. Colorado Parks and Wildlife officials said the animal died of “capture myopathy,” which is defined as stress and physical exertion from being restrained. Station workers dragged the dead moose down the mountain behind a truck. An anonymous source captured the deletion on video that was sent to the Colorado Sun.

Colorado Parks and Wildlife officials investigated the animal’s death after the resort reported the incident. Colorado Parks and Wildlife spokesman John Livingston called the death “a unique and very rare situation that no one I’ve spoken to at CPW has ever seen happen before.”

Livingston said Summit County wildlife officials at the agency do not recall anything similar at any of the county’s four ski areas.

The agency is working with Keystone officials on strategies to prevent the death of another animal. It is likely that the station will begin to cover its snow guns and electrical cords. The electrical wires supporting snowmaking machines are thicker and larger than typical extension cords.

“As a moose is wrapped up in something like this, it will pull and push harder and harder to try to break free and entangle itself even more,” Livingston said, noting that the animal’s meat has was donated to a local non-profit organization.

Video sent to the Colorado Sun shows workers at the Keystone Ski Resort removing a moose that was killed after being trapped in the electrical cords of snowmaking equipment.

A Vail Resorts spokeswoman said resort workers have never encountered any animals tangled in snowmaking equipment. Colorado Parks and Wildlife said it is working with the company on any operational adjustments to better protect wildlife.

“This was a sad and rare accident. Even still, we plan to do more in the future to prevent rare events like this from happening at all,” Lindsay Hogan of Vail Resorts said in a statement sent. via email.”We immediately notified Colorado Parks and Wildlife when the moose was discovered and removed the moose under their guidance and direction.”

Last month, the company clashed with the Keystone Forest Service when work to install the elevator stretched beyond an allowable limit. Keystone has been forced to delay the opening of a new chairlift in its Bergman Bowl for a year as it struggles to repair damage caused by the illegal temporary road the company built over the boundary forest of the ski area.

Colorado Parks and Wildlife said this is the time of year when wildlife officers typically see more problems with wildlife getting caught in nets, decorative lights, hammocks and fences in populated areas. . Residents of Park City, Utah this week captured video of sheriff’s deputies releasing a bull moose entangled in a garden hammock. Colorado Parks and Wildlife officers this week in Estes Park calmed a bull elk to cut the fences of the animal’s antlers.

“As this incident shows, it’s important for all members of our mountain communities to be vigilant when it comes to finding ways to be a good neighbor to wildlife,” Livingston said.

The last

Procession, funeral of slain Arvada policeman Dillon Vakoff

Procession, funeral of slain Arvada policeman Dillon Vakoff

Vakoff, 27, died in a hospital on Sunday after being shot as he and another officer responded to a disturbance that…


What works: Hello entrepreneurs, it's Denver Startup Week!

What works: Hello entrepreneurs, it’s Denver Startup Week!

It’s year 11 for the annual festival of entrepreneurship that is Denver Startup Week, which begins Monday. And it’s still full…


Opinion: Colorado newspapers need new models, better owners

Opinion: Colorado newspapers need new models, better owners

A cautionary tale from the former editor of the Aspen Times


Colorado man, 71, convicted in 1982 of murdering 2 women

Colorado man, 71, convicted in 1982 of murdering 2 women

Alan Lee Phillips was arrested last year, authorities used DNA evidence to identify him as a suspect in the murder of Annette…


Residence of Democratic state senate candidate running in back-to-back Colorado district is challenged in court

Residence of Democratic state senate candidate running in back-to-back Colorado district is challenged in court

State Rep. Kyle Mullica is the third state senator or Senate nominee whose residency has come into question in recent times…


About George Dailey

Check Also

New England has 5 of the best ski resorts in North America, according to Condé Nast Traveler

New Englanders don’t have to travel far to find the best ski mountains in North …